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Ped 1 students! Are you stressing about how you’re going to get all of those assessments and lessons done during your field experience? Relax! It is not an impossible task! I’ll admit that not all of my plans turn out the way that I want them to, but the organization of my data for the Differentiated Instruction Plan saved my life when I was finally ready to sit down and type up my paper!

Here are some tips to help you keep your sanity as you work through your DIP!

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*Student’s name shown is fictionalized.

During my time in Ped 1, we were asked to assess and develop a plan for three different students. To make sure that I wasn’t mixing up the students’ information, I kept a three-prong folder for every student. Each student had a different color, and I filled the folder with their Marie Clay assessments, running records, interest interview, writing samples, and individualized lesson plans. I kept a completely different folder for assessments that had not been done yet. Also…I wrote the student’s reading level on the inside of the folder so I wouldn’t forget!

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I took a glimpse at a calendar to see how much time I had in the field and planned my first assessments, differentiated lessons, and post assessments. I used a sticky note for each student and wrote down the date that I wanted to complete an activity with them. For example, in the picture above, I used this sticky note to keep track of when I would be teaching my lessons and providing a post assessment for this student. If a student was absent on the day that I had to complete a lesson, it was easy to switch things around and get another student’s lesson completed.

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After each lesson, I took about two quick minutes to write down a reflection of my lesson. In the field, you really don’t have time to write down a lot of information after your lesson. I used a blank notecard (4×6) to record every session with my student. I wrote down the date that the lesson was completed, as well as one to three points about how the lesson went. I liked doing this right away because the experience was fresh on my brain. You can also use a regular sheet of paper to log your reflections and keep them in your folder. I just decided to use this notecard to keep me from writing too much!

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